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-Workshop Archive

 

New Classes Offered

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

GIS is a system that integrates hardware, software, and data for capturing, managing, analyzing, and displaying all
forms of geographically referenced information. GIS allows us to view, understand, interpret, and visualize data in many
ways that reveal relationships, patterns, and trends in the form of maps, reports, and charts. Simply stated, GIS is the
merging of cartography, statistical analysis, and computer science technology.
This workshop will provide an overview of what GIS can be used for and is meant for people who are curious
about what GIS can do for them. A question and answer period will be provided as well as an access code for an
introductory on-line course from ESRI.


Introduction to ArcGIS Online and ESRI for Office

This workshop will introduce new and existing GIS users to the future of ESRI’s GIS through ArcGIS Online and
ESRI for Office. As you may know, GIS is moving more and more "into the cloud" and Binghamton University now has
access this environment with an ArcGIS Online Organizational account. ArcGIS Online is a place online where users can
create, host, and share mapping content including basic maps all the way to more advanced applications. No desktop GIS
software is required for its use. This has potential to be very beneficial for personal and classroom use.
With an ArcGIS Online login, users have access to ESRI for Office. It is a free extension for Microsoft Excel and
PowerPoint enabling map creation and analysis directly within these products. Maps can then be shared with ArcGIS
Online.

Past Classes Offered

Introduction to Census Products

This 2-part workshop will provide an overview of the major U.S. Census Data products. This will include the Decennial Census, the American Community Survey (ACS), and Public Use Microdata Series (PUMS). The Decennial Census is taken every 10 years and is a critical count of population which affects various aspects of government decision making. The ACS has been around since 2000 and will soon replace the Decennial Census long form. The workshop will detail the need for the ACS and how it works. PUMS is a Census derived database that is used for social and economic research. PUMS consists of thirty-nine high-precision samples of the American population drawn from fifteen federal censuses from 1850-2000 and from the American Community Surveys of 2000-2006. Collectively, these comprise the richest source of quantitative information on long-term changes in the American population on a local basis.

Part 1 of the workshop is a lecture format describing these datasets. Part 2 features live demonstrations on how to download, manipulate, and map the data. Hands on use of these datasets is also included.


Introduction to PUMS Microdata from the U. S. Census

 This workshop will provide an overview of PUMS data with live demonstrations. Specifically, how to query the dataset, create an extract, and work with the data within SPSS. The Public Use Microdata Series (PUMS) is a Census derived database that is used for social and economic research. PUMS consists of thirty-nine high-precision samples of the American population drawn from fifteen federal censuses from 1850-2000 and from the American Community Surveys of 2000-2006. Collectively, these comprise the richest source of quantitative information on long-term changes in the American population on a local basis. These microdata provide information about individual persons and households. This makes it possible for researchers to create tabulations tailored to their particular questions. The flexibility offered by microdata is particularly important for historical and ethnic research because the aggregate tabulations produced by the Census Bureau are often not comparable across time.

Introduction to the American Community Survey

 The American Community Survey (ACS) is a annual nationwide survey designed and implemented by the Census Bureau to give communities information about their demographic, socio-economic and housing characteristics. The ACS is scheduled to replace the long form in the decennial census, beginning in 2010. From that time on, censuses will consist of a short form only. This workshop will introduce you to the ACS and detail geographies and variables available as well as how to download and work with the data.

 

Introduction to Longitudinal Census Data with Geolytics

 Census tract boundaries have changed considerably in the last 30 years. Therefore, it is virtually impossible to accurately map data changes over time for a particular location. A new software company named Geolytics has created software that has normalized all historic tract boundaries (dating back to 1970) to the current tract boundaries from the 2000 Census. This workshop will introduce the use of Geolytics software for extracting and mapping longitudinal census data from 1970-2000. Lab time will be emphasized. Basic knowledge of ArcView software is required.

   

Introduction to Census Migration Data

 This workshop will familiarize students with Census 2000 Migration files. These data are very useful for research related to the types and numbers of people moving from place to place. The Migration files are highly underutilized because they appear in a format that makes their use by beginners difficult. After some familiarity and manipulation, data from these files are suitable for mapping. Lab time will be emphasized. Basic knowledge of ArcView software is required.

   

Secondary Data and Longitudinal Census

 Working with secondary data can significantly reduce the time involved with data aquisition and entry. This workshop will include methods on locating, extracting, and mapping secondary data such as crime, health, and socio-economic. In addition, this workshop will introduce the use of Geolytics software for extracting and mapping longitudinal census data from 1970-2000. Lab time will be emphasized.

   

Digital Air Photograph Analysis Using New Local Photos

 Air photos are widely used in environmental, social and other types of research. Natural color, 1998 Digital air photos of Broome County have been obtained are now available through the GIS Core Facility. 2002 and 2006 Natural Color Air Photos are also available through the New York State GIS Clearinghouse. The course provides an introduction to digital aerial photography with particular emphasis on the photos of Broome County. Topics to be covered will include how to access air photos, how to incorporate them into a GIS and, finally, how to interpret and analyze the photos.

   

 Intro to GIS: A Conceptual Overview

 This beginner’s workshop provides an overview of the capabilities and uses of GIS.  Background information is helpful before trying to tackle GIS.  Emphasis is placed on the use of GIS in disciplines outside of Geography.

   

 U.S. Census 2000 and Other Secondary Data

 There are an increasing number of secondary data sources available via the Web. Such data are often meaningful when mapped at various geographical scales using GIS. This course will examine several web-based secondary databases. The relative currency of the U.S. Census 2000 data will mean extra emphasis will be put on census data. Longitudinal census data will be examined as well. After reviewing several databases, a lab-oriented approach will use one-on-one interaction to allow users to create maps using different databases.

   

 Intro to ArcView

 This workshop is designed to introduce new users to ArcView GIS 3.2.   Participants will learn how to navigate ArcView’s documents, menus and toolbars, customize the interface, add files, and create thematic maps and layouts.  This workshop is a prerequisite for Intermediate ArcView.  It is assumed all participants have a basic introductory knowledge of GIS.  Considerable hands-on experience is provided through the use of lab exercises.

   

Intermediate ArcView

This workshop takes a more in depth look at ArcView 3.2. The following topics will be covered:

§         Table Manipulation – learn how to add GPS data and other data tables to a project, create new tables, edit existing tables, and join & link tables.

§         Geocoding – learn how to plot tabular data containing coordinate pairs or addresses as points on a map.

§         GIS Queries and Analysis – learn how to create attribute and locational queries, create new data using geoprocessing tools, and analyze data using a variety of geospatial techniques.

   

Intro to GPS

This hands-on workshop will introduce the theory behind GPS and show participants how to actually use a GPS in the field.  From satellite constellations to plotting GPS data in a GIS, this half-day course covers it all. A Trimble GeoXM handheld unit is used with ESRI's ArcPAD software.

 

 

 

Last updated on January 15, 2014 by Kevin Heard